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There is a fine line between fear and anger, especially during a heated confrontation. In a self-defense case, reasonable fear suggests a homicide may have been justified. Anger spells murder. Dunn said he told Davis, just before firing, “You’re not going to kill me, you son of a bitch.” The statement connotes fear, with a tinge of anger. A witness, however, testified that Dunn said, “You’re not going to talk to me like that.” The statement conveys anger without fear. Assistant state attorney John Guy told the jury that “Jordan Davis disrespected Dunn, but he never threatened him.” He asked the jury to believe that Dunn shot Davis as a matter of wounded pride. While the first jury was split, a jury at a second trial rendered a swift guilty verdict, evidence they saw more anger than fear.

Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018

Stan Campbell, Co-Founder and COO for CCW Safe, recently hosted the Firing Line Radio Show for Phillip Naman, as he was on vacation. This show is now in podcast form at CCW Safe. For more information on The Firing Line Show, visit The Firing Line on AM 590, The Answer. The show features attorneys Matthew Cubiero and Kyle Sweet. Matthew Cubeiro’s primary practice areas include firearm regulatory compliance and litigation. He also assists with local ordinance issues, legislative analysis, civil rights advocacy, and general civil litigation with Michel and Associates in Long Beach, California.

Posted: Wednesday, August 8, 2018

This episode of "In Self Defense" features Don and Shawn talking about the recent shooting in Clearwater, FL over a handicapped parking spot at a convenience store. On Thursday, July 19th, Markeis McGlockton parked in a handicap spot with his girlfriend and three young kids before going inside a convenience store with his five-year-old son to buy snacks. Outside, Michael Drejka approached McGlockton's girlfriend, Britany Jacobs. Jacobs says Drejka yelled at her for parking in a handicapped spot without a permit.

Posted: Monday, August 6, 2018

When Michael Dunn heard the loud music emanating from a red Dodge Durango, he complained about it to his fiance Rhonda Rouer. The four teens in the Durango had taken a break from “girl shopping” at a local mall to get breath mints and some smokes. Rouer testified that Dunn said, “I hate that thug music.” Nonetheless, he parked right next to the Durango -- so closely that front passenger Tevin Thompson said he wouldn’t have been able to get out of the car. While Rouer went inside to get some chips and wine, Dunn asked Thompson to turn the music down, politely by all accounts, and Thompson complied. That’s when Jordan Davis, the seventeen-year-old in the back seat, exploded. He insisted that Thompson turn the music back up and went into a profanity-laced verbal tirade focused on Michael Dunn. Thompson tried to put Davis’ window up to defuse the situation, but Dunn had lowered his window and asked, “Are you talking to me?”

Posted: Friday, August 3, 2018

This week, Ernest Langdon talks about having a secondary light source if you carry a firearm with a mounted light.

Posted: Monday, July 30, 2018

By 7:30pm it was dark -- Black Friday, November 23, 2012. As Michael Dunn and his fiancee Rhonda Rouer pulled into the parking lot of a Jacksonville, Florida convenience store, they could hear rumbling bass notes emanating from a red Dodge Durango SUV. Rouer testified that Dunn said “I hate that thug music” before he pulled into the spot immediately on the passenger side of the Durango. “I know,” she said. She kissed him before going inside for a bottle of wine and a bag of chips. At trial, Dunn insisted he didn’t call it “thug music.” He would have called it “rap crap.”

Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018

This week, Ernest Langdon talks about developing a system for your own personal protection. He discusses his own preferences in firearms selection, ammunition, clothing, and more.

Posted: Monday, July 23, 2018

By 7:30pm it was dark -- Black Friday, November 23, 2012. As Michael Dunn and his fiancee Rhonda Rouer pulled into the parking lot of a Jacksonville, Florida convenience store, they could hear rumbling bass notes emanating from a red Dodge Durango SUV. Rouer testified that Dunn said “I hate that thug music” before he pulled into the spot immediately on the passenger side of the Durango. “I know,” she said. She kissed him before going inside for a bottle of wine and a bag of chips. At trial, Dunn insisted he didn’t call it “thug music.” He would have called it “rap crap.”

Posted: Friday, July 20, 2018

I’m often asked to describe the most common way people screw up their self-defense claim. The truth is there isn’t a single most common way. People manage to find an apparently infinite number of ways to step outside the bounds of the law. Often, there were a bunch of exits off that jail-bound freeway that they could have taken, but didn’t.

Posted: Thursday, July 19, 2018

Our staff at CCW Safe has over 75 years of police experience collectively and have all been involved in hundreds of violent encounters. A few of us, in a police capacity, were forced to use deadly force and were unsuccessfully sued for our lawful actions. Although those instances were unavoidable, we have all over the past 20 years employed techniques daily to prevent being the cause of a deadly encounter. And in our collective experience, those who are best trained and are most comfortable in their abilities.. use less force and do not launch themselves into unnecessary deadly encounters. In continuing to help make our members be their own risk managers we wanted to introduce “7 Tips to Prevent a Deadly Encounter.”

Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018

"In Self Defense" podcast by Don West and Shawn Vincent on the Gasser case is now available.

Posted: Friday, July 13, 2018

This case of the week involves a vicious bare-handed attack in the back of a Milwaukee restaurant that was stopped by an employee wielding a handgun: The scene is in the cooking area of the restaurant where two women are working, one closer to the camera than the other. A large black male enters the frame just below the camera, stepping behind the counter. He throws a vicious punch into the face of the closer woman, who reels back in stunned pain. The male continues to advance on the second woman.

Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018

In the recent "The Art of De-Escalation" course that was added at the CCW Safe Academy, Co-Founder and CEO Mike Darter talks about a couple things that can get concealed carriers in trouble, even if a legitimate threat exists.

Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Stan Campbell, Co-Founder and COO of CCW Safe, talks about 10 things to remember if you are involved in a self defense shooting. Stan is a retired police lieutenant, and has trained over 4000 police officers and citizens as an instructor in self-defense, use of force and de-escalation techniques.

Posted: Monday, July 9, 2018

Immediately after the shooting, Gasser exited his vehicle, still carrying his .40 caliber Smith & Wesson. Wendell Sam witnessed the shooting and saw McKnight laying between cars, still moving. When Sam and another witness started rendering aid to McKnight, Gasser put his sidearm down, but made no effort to call 911 or to help. Prosecutors raised the issue of Gasser’s lack of action at trial; he seemed more concerned with justifying his actions than he did with the fate of the man he shot.

Posted: Friday, July 6, 2018

This week’s case is a recent criminal trial sentencing out of Connecticut that purportedly involves principles of “Stand-Your-Ground,” but that in reality, of course, has nothing to do with “Stand-Your-Ground” at all.

Posted: Wednesday, July 4, 2018

In the recent "The Art of De-Escalation" course that was added at the CCW Safe Academy, Co-Founder and CEO Mike Darter talks about a couple things that can get concealed carriers in trouble, even if a legitimate threat exists.

Posted: Monday, July 2, 2018

Immediately after the shooting, Gasser exited his vehicle, still carrying his .40 caliber Smith & Wesson. Wendell Sam witnessed the shooting and saw McKnight laying between cars, still moving. When Sam and another witness started rendering aid to McKnight, Gasser put his sidearm down, but made no effort to call 911 or to help. Prosecutors raised the issue of Gasser’s lack of action at trial; he seemed more concerned with justifying his actions than he did with the fate of the man he shot.

Posted: Friday, June 29, 2018

This case of the week involves the recent murder trial of a Texas man, Terry Thompson, who got into a barehanded fight with a drunk, John Hernandez, in a Denny’s parking lot. Thompson ended up choking Hernandez to death, and being tried on charges of murder, manslaughter, and criminally negligent homicide. That trial ended days ago in a mistrial when the jury was unable to arrive at a unanimous verdict, and the prosecution has already announced his intent to re-try the case.

Posted: Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Ronald Gasser had been involved in a five-mile “tit-for-tat road rage” incident with former New York Jets running back Joe McKnight when Gasser found himself boxed in at a red light. McKnight got out of the car, approached Gasser, and leaned into his open driver’s side window. Gasser fired three shots from his .40 caliber Smith & Wesson pistol, killing McKnight with a round to his chest.

Posted: Friday, June 22, 2018

This week’s case of the week is, unusually, not an appellate court decision, but rather a recently concluded trial out of the town of Walker, Louisiana, which was brought to my attention by one of our Law of Self Defense Instructor Program graduates, and that I felt raised some interesting legal issues. The case involves a homeowner who successfully disarms a home invader, and then seizes defeat from the jaws of victory by exceeding the boundaries of lawful self-defense.

Posted: Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Ronald Gasser shot former New York Jets running back Joe McKnight in broad daylight at a busy intersection in a suburb of New Orleans on December 1, 2016. After a five mile “tit-for-tat mutual road rage” incident, McKnight exited his vehicle and leaned into Gasser’s car. Gasser fired three shots from his .40 caliber Smith & Wesson pistol, killing McKnight. After eight hours of questioning, investigators released Gasser based on his self-defense claim. However, when witness statements and forensic evidence was found to refute some of Gasser’s claims, authorities arrested the 56-year-old on charges of second degree murder.

Posted: Friday, June 15, 2018

We are pleased to announce, along with our new partnership with Andrew Branca, and The Law Of Self Defense, we will be publishing part of his "Case Of The Week" podcast for our members and followers.

Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018

CCW Safe is happy to announce a new partnership with Andrew Branca, attorney and author of "The Law of Self Defense". CCW Safe members can now receive a free copy of his book, "The Law of Self Defense", for the shipping cost of only $7.95. This paperback book normally sells for $24.95, and is a must have for anyone who carries in self defense. Members will receive an email on how to obtain your free copy, so make sure to check your email for the offer. If you are not currently opted in, you can log into your account on this site and do so, or you can login and check your passes under your account.

Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018

After a five-mile “tit-for-tat mutual road rage” incident, former New York Jets running back Joe McKnight got out of his car at a red light and confronted 56-year-old Ronald Gasser. It’s a matter of debate whether McKnight simply rested his forearms on the opened window of Gasser’s car as the prosecution said, or whether McKnight lunged at Gasser as the defense claimed. What was not in dispute, however, is that Gasser fired his .40 caliber Smith & Wesson pistol three times, striking McKnight in his right shoulder, his hands and, fatally, his chest.

Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018

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